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dankiidoll:

fabulousandthick:

theplussideofme:

My “most days” is the bottom left, and my “every now and then” is the top right.

Embrace your body and love your curves! That’s not always easy to do but knowing there are people out there who find you beautiful and love you helps. I love my blog so much and when someone tells me they love it too and it has helped them it makes me smile.

For all of you struggling with this.

(Source: rachelmloose)

Everyone who terrifies you is sixty-five percent water. And everyone you love is made of stardust, and I know sometimes you cannot even breathe deeply, and the night sky is no home, and you have cried yourself to sleep enough times that you are down to your last two percent, but nothing is infinite, not even loss. You are made of the sea and the stars, and one day you are going to find yourself again.
Finn Butler (via heartique)

(Source: oofpoetry)

Gillian Flynn’s ‘Sharp Objects’ is coming to television | EW.com

duckduckbooks:

twirlyeleven:

bookmad:

EW has confirmed that Entertainment One Television is currently working to turn Flynn’s debut novel, Sharp Objects, into a one-hour serialized drama.

[PTERODACTYL SCREECH]

{FLAPS ARMS} GILLIAN’S TAKING OVER THE WORLD

SCREAMS FOR DAYS

Holy. Crap. I just gave this book to a friend to read because (like me) she wasn’t really into Gone Girl. Of Flynn’s three published novels, Sharp Objects is my favorite and while this is exciting, I don’t know if I could handle watching that heart-and-mind-ripping train wreck on screen.

tamorapierce:

memily:

adorabelledearheart:

thepliablefoe:

Norwegian forest cats are the best.

They look like little snow lions.

MORE REASONS WHY NORWEGIAN FOREST CATS ARE THE BEST:

The colloquial term for them is “skogkatten”.

They’re also called “fairy cats” in Norway, because they’re so pretty.

They run down trees headfirst.

They’re fricking gigantic and they purr really loud.

They literally walk over snow like motherloving Legolas.

In Norse mythology, skogkatts pull the goddess Freya’s carriage.

Who doesn’t want a carriage pulled by cats?

Viking cats. End of story.

Oh what a terrible thing it appears that I haven’t reblogged these glorious beasts this year yet

We have come to pronounce judgment upon those who do not respect the will of the Catmoot.

(Source: attack-on-pre-calculus)

prospect-euphoria:

sandflake:

I dearly wish that people would view their bodies as they view flowers…

Veins everywhere?

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gorgeous~

Skin patches? Birthmarks?

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hella rad~

Scars? Stretch marks?

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beautiful~

Freckles? Moles? Acne scars?

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heckie yeah~

Large? Curvy?

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lovely~

Small? Thin?

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charming~

Missing a few pieces?

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handsome as ever~

Feel like you just look weird?

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you’re fantastic looking~

THIS is the best post ever. 

Here’s a basic rule: if you’re reading or watching a Shakespeare play, and you’re not imagining the actors standing in front of a mosh pit of jeering Londoners waiting to throw vegetables at the stage, you’re doing it wrong.

Shakespeare might have written the best works in the English language, or given us profound insight into the nature of humanity, or whatever — but his works wouldn’t have survived to our day if he hadn’t been popular when he was alive, and he wouldn’t have been popular when he was alive if he hadn’t been able to please the crowd. And that includes a lot of dirty jokes. A lot.

Sometimes in incredibly inappropriate places. We’re here to rescue a few of those for you, and retroactively embarrass the heck out of your fourteen-year-old self, who had to stand up in English class and read things that, in retrospect, are absolutely filthy.

This isn’t about the stuff that always does crack fourteen-year-olds up in English class, but is totally innocent: the “bring me my long sword, ho!” sort of thing.

But the kids who lose it every time the word “ho” is uttered are closer to the spirit of Shakespeare than the teacher who demands they treat the words like museum pieces.

Sure, it would be awkward for teachers to explain the Elizabethan double entendres to their students — but pretending they don’t exist makes Shakespeare seem unnecessarily stuffy and difficult.

So we’re going to start with the most obvious innuendoes, and move on to some seriously advanced sex punnery that is probably going to blow your mind.

Reading Shakespeare without the sex jokes is the real tragedy. (via newsweek)

some seriously advanced sex punnery that is probably going to blow your mind.

(via bethrevis)
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